Killing Dog Fleas In Your House And Yard - Part One

Flea Free - The Easy Way

 

Killing Dog Fleas Image

Far too many people think the crisis is over when they’ve done away with every single flea on good old Spot. Little do they know that a horde of bad old fleas are still around, waiting to pounce on their dog the next chance they get. Know that killing dog fleas doesn’t end with eliminating the ones on your dog.

After all, you have to consider where those fleas came from in the first place (yard)…and where else they might be hiding (house).

This is why killing dog fleas in your immediate environment is just as important as ridding ol’ Spot of the little pests? maybe even more so. In its short lifetime, a single flea can lay hundreds to thousands of eggs. One survivor in the house or yard can cause an entire infestation if left to its own devices, leaving Spot open to trouble sooner than later.

Several steps must be taken to prevent this potential dilemma, all of which are aimed at treating dog fleas for good.


Step One: Pull the suckers into a vacuum.

Once you’ve ensured that Spot is flea-free, you should immediately start ridding the house of any and all fleas. Cleaning is always a good idea, but vacuuming in particular could prove to be very effective.

Fleas are naturally attracted to a number of things that could signal a potential host is nearby. Heat, sound, vibrations and such are likely to stir some activity in flea eggs and lure adult fleas out of hiding.


If all goes well, the vibrations caused by your vacuum cleaner will cause fleas to hatch (a good thing, since they can remain dormant in that state until an actual host (i.e. Spot) happens along) and suck up the larvae before they get a chance to mature into adulthood. If you’re lucky, you’ll be able to suck up a few stray adults as well.

Remember to always seal and throw the vacuum bag away when you’re done. Fleas may still be alive and well even after being sucked into your cleaner, and could just reproduce there if you let them be.

Step Two: Chemical warfare.

Of course, there are times when you have no choice but to break out the big guns. No matter how much cleaning you do, it may never seem to be enough to completely eradicate these pests.

There always seem to be some adults who manage to escape, and some eggs that manage to survive your efforts. But most, if not all, will meet their maker when exposed to chemicals specifically made for treating dog fleas.

Adulticides and Insect Growth Inhibitors are the most conventional and trusted weapons in the war against fleas. The former works by killing adult fleas, while the latter renders any remaining flea incapable of reproduction, effectively breaking the flea’s life cycle.

Time and again, these two have proven that they are not only capable of killing dog fleas, but also of wiping out the entire flea population if used correctly.

My next article talks about the many forms these weapons come in and how best to use them to your advantage. Also included in the discussion will be the all important third step of Killing Dog Fleas In Your House And Yard.

Killing Dog Fleas in Your House and Yard - Part One

Killing Dog Fleas In Your House and Yard - Yard - House - Home - Remedies - Natural - Remedy - Dog - Cat - Dogs - Cats - Kittens - Puppy - Puppies - Dogs - Humans - Cats - Rabbit - Mice - Videos - Tips - Facts - Prevention - Exterminator - House Flea - Treatment - Solution - Fleas In The Yard - Garden - Treating Humans - Protection - Household - Products - Canine - Infestation - Spray - Collar - Carpet - House - Animal - Kill - Killing - Collars - Human - Bombs - Repellent - Natural Flea Treatment - Humans - Problem - Zapper - Pets - Fogger - Remedies - Trap - Drops - Yard - Bombing - Symptoms - Life Cycle - Lyme Disease - Season - Home - Insecticides - Pesticides - Bites - Bite - Repeller - Repellent - Removal - Bites On Humans - Images - Pictures - Pest - Flee - Flees - Home Remedies - Control - Pests - Flea Powder - Trap - Rid - Kill

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By Melissa Russell m.russell@cybersynergy.co.uk